Sodium Lauryl Sulfoacetate: What is SLSA?

Sodium Lauryl Sulfoacetate: What is SLSA?

Hello to my readers! I took an unexpected week off from blogging or videoing. (Hey, I didn’t realize that was a real word) But I’m back on the saddle this week!!

Sodium Lauryl Sulfoacetate, or SLSA.

Sounds like a scary chemical to keep high on a shelf away from the kids. But actually, this is one I’m sure the kids, and their skin, would LOVE!

What is Sodium Lauryl Sulfoacetate? Simply put, is the “bubble factor” in many Bath bombs and Solid Bubble Baths. According to Brambleberry.com it is a great alternative to Sodium Lauryl Sulfate. This product is derived from coconut and palm oils, and conforms to Ecocert’s natural and organic cosmetic standard and is 100% of natural origin. This fine white powder is excellent for blending into “bath bombs,” bath fizzys, powdered bubble baths, bath salts for super foam, scrubs and more. Makes a blanket of bubbles that last! Long lasting SLSA powder provides excellent foam and viscosity response.

Although an ingredient’s name may sound similar to another, it does not mean that the molecules are similar with respect to shape, size, performance or even function. Sodium Lauryl Sulfoacetate sounds similar to Sodium Lauryl Sulfate, however, the two molecules are quite different from each other. Sodium Lauryl Sulfoacetate is a large molecule ingredient. Large molecule ingredients are considered to be mild, gentle, and non-irritating, as they cannot penetrate the skin. In contrast, Sodium Lauryl Sulfate is a small molecule ingredient, and is capable of penetrating the skin, which can increase the occurrence of skin irritation.

In other words, SLSA usually won’t cause any issues with irritation or sensitivity. As with any ingredient, be sure to test out on a small area of your skin to check for any reactions.

Working with SLSA is pretty easy as well. It comes in powder and flake form, I normally use the powder, I find its easy to incorporate into my recipes and it dissolves quickly in water. The only caution with using SLSA is that is is a fine powder. It can cause a tickle in your nose and throat. If you find it bothers you when mixing your recipes, a NIOSH certified mask (can usually be found at any hardware store) is recommended. Usually the powder only bothers me when I first measure it out with my dry ingredients, once I add the wet ones, it is no longer an issue.

Over all, SLSA has become one of my top ingredients, mostly because the bubbles I am able to make for my son’s baths make him so happy, and that makes me happy!

Are you a bubble bath lover? Tell me about your IDEAL bubble bath: Candles? Music? Rose Petals? Let me know in the comments!

Be Blessed

Astarie

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